Keeping your home safe and secure

POSTED: Monday, April 1, 2013 - 12:00am
UPDATED: Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - 12:02pm

(StatePoint) Whether you're making a fast trip to the store or leaving on a two-week vacation, are you confident that locking your doors is enough to keep your home safe and secure?

You can go a step further by investing in impact-resistant laminate glass in your windows, according to experts. Engineered to deter forced entry by intruders, these energy-efficient windows also resist high winds and flying debris during severe storms and reduce unwanted outside noise from entering your home.

Similar in design to impact-resistant glass found in code-driven coastal area homes, special laminated glass known as SafePoint glass offers extra protection for homes, 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

"This glass is designed to help make a home a safe haven," says Ken Kubus of Simonton Windows. "In addition to helping protect the home, laminated glass provides excellent energy efficiency and serves as a barrier against heat transfer. It also plays a role in lowering heating and cooling costs while keeping interiors comfortable. And it screens out much of the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays that can damage carpets, furnishings and artwork."

There are several other things homeowners can do to help keep their families safe at home -- especially when it comes to windows:

o Children should be taught at a young age to stay away from windows for their own safety. Parents can help safeguard children by keeping furniture (including cribs) and anything else a child can climb, away from windows.

o If your home has double hung windows, open only the top part of the window that children cannot reach, to allow for ventilation.

o Never push on window screens, as they will not support the weight of a child or family pet. Remember, the primary purpose of a screen is to keep insects outside.

o Lock windows when not in use to protect against intruders and make it more difficult for curious children to open windows.

o Do not paint or nail windows shut. Every window in the home that is designed to be opened should be operational in case of an emergency.

o Refrain from nailing or attaching decorative lights to the interior or exterior of window frames.

o Plant shrubs or grass, and place "soft landscaping" like bark or mulch, directly underneath windows to help lessen the impact should someone accidently fall out of a window.

More window safety tips are available by calling 1-800-SIMONTON to request a free copy of a booklet entitled, "A few things to think about when thinking about your home."

From planning emergency escape routes to installing safe doors and windows, there are many different things you can do to help keep your family safe at home even when you are not there to protect them.

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